Dating in plymouth devon

Plymouth's early history extends to the Bronze Age, when a first settlement emerged at Mount Batten.

This settlement continued as a trading post for the Roman Empire, until it was surpassed by the more prosperous village of Sutton founded in the ninth century, now called Plymouth.

As the river silted up in the early 11th century, mariners and merchants were forced to settle downriver at the current day Barbican near the river mouth.

dating in plymouth devon-90

It was an important embarkation point for US troops for D-Day.

Although the dockyards were the principal targets, much of the city centre and over 3,700 houses were completely destroyed and more than 1,000 civilians lost their lives.

By the mid-17th century, commodities manufactured elsewhere in England cost too much to transport to Plymouth, and the city had no means of processing sugar or tobacco imports, major products from the colonies.

It played a part in the Atlantic slave trade during the early 18th century, although it was relatively small.

Construction of the Royal Citadel began in 1665, after the Restoration; it was armed with cannon facing both out to sea and into the town, rumoured to be a reminder to residents not to oppose the Crown.

Throughout the 17th century Plymouth had gradually lost its pre-eminence as a trading port.

In 1914 three neighbouring independent towns, viz., the county borough of Plymouth, the county borough of Devonport, and the urban district of East Stonehouse were merged to form a single County Borough.

The combined town took the name of Plymouth which, in 1928, achieved city status.

Aside from the dockyard in the town of Devonport, industries in Plymouth such as the gasworks, the railways and tramways, and a number of small chemical works had begun to develop in the 19th century, continuing into the 20th century.

During the Second World War, Devonport was the headquarters of Western Approaches Command until 1941, and Sunderland flying boats were operated by the Royal Australian Air Force.

This was largely due to Plymouth's status as a major port.

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